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Author: Oscar Ruiz Fernandez
ISBN: 9781784531171
Format: Hardback
Extent: 296 pp
Price: £ 85.00
Publication: December 2019
Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

The early 17th century was a time of great literature the era of Cervantes and Shakespeare but also of international tension and heightened diplomacy. This book looks at the relations between Spain under Philip III and Philip IV and England under James I in the period 1603-1625. It examines the essential issues that established the framework for diplomatic relations between the two states, looking not only at questions of war and peace, but also of trade and piracy.

Óscar Alfredo Ruiz Fernández expertly argues that the diplomatic relationship was vital to the strategic interests of both powers and also played a highly significant role in the domestic agendas of each country. Based on Spanish and English archival sources, England and Spain in the Early Modern Era provides, for the first time, a clear picture of diplomacy between England and Spain in the early modern era.

Full of insights and startlingly contemporary resonances, this is the richest study to date of Spain and England’s diplomatic, political, and military relations from the 1604 Treaty of London until the outbreak of war in 1625. Making ample use of a range of untapped archival sources, this fascinating study illuminates the complexities of European dissensions in a globalising world.  Dr Alexander Samson, Reader in Early Modern Studies, University College London, UK

Based on substantial archival research, this book makes an important contribution to understanding the policies of the Stuarts and the Habsburgs against a background of international conflicts. It addresses the implications for each monarchy and ultimately, given the scope of the Spanish Empire and England’s incipient presence in North America and the Caribbean, for international and global histories.  Silvia Z. Mitchell, Assistant Professor of History, Purdue University, USA